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A book of the United Nations basic documents translated into the languages of the indigenous peoples of the North of Sakhalin was presented in Moscow

25 February 2015, Moscow, Russian Federation. The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd. (“Sakhalin Energy”) presented a book of the United Nations basic documents published in the languages of the indigenous peoples of the North of Sakhalin.

This publication is the result of a collective effort, bringing together, under one cover, the United Nations Declarations in the four major indigenous languages of Sakhalin. The book is accompanied by a compact disc with audio recordings of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples read out by native-speaking narrators in Nivkh, Uilta, Evenk and Nanai.

“Sakhalin Energy operates on Sakhalin Island which is home to a number of indigenous minorities of the North. The company is focused on protecting the basic rights and freedoms of the indigenous people, promoting their sustainable development, helping to improve their health services and education, sharing their passion for indigenous ways of life and preserving their unique culture and languages. Regrettably, many indigenous languages of Sakhalin are now endangered. Sakhalin Energy for many years has been supporting the linguistic studies and publications, working to preserve these languages”, - says Roman Dashkov, Sakhalin Energy CEO. “This publication, we hope, will not only help preserve the languages and cultures of the indigenous people of the North of Sakhalin, but will also contribute to enhancing the leadership potential of the local indigenous communities.”

Mr Ryszard Komenda, Senior Human Rights Adviser representing the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in the Russian Federation, indicated that since 2012, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and Sakhalin Energy have been collaborating to support the translation of the United Nations’ basic documents – Universal Declaration of Human Rights and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – into the languages of indigenous people living in the north of Sakhalin. These documents encompass a broad range of human rights and basic freedoms of indigenous people, including the right to preserve and develop their cultural diversity and distinct identity. The translation of the United Nations Declarations and the publication of this book will help preserve the unique culture of the indigenous people of the North of Sakhalin, promoting further expansion of their capacities. It is noteworthy that the newly published book of the United Nations Declarations contains a new vocabulary and new word collocations, thus stimulating the development of the indigenous languages. Our special thanks go to the linguists and translators specialising in the indigenous languages, who contributed immensely to the preparation and accomplishment of this project.

“Language is the key mechanism for transmitting the indigenous people’s knowledge from generation to generation, and one of the key indicators of a living indigenous culture. It is also one of the essential elements of the indigenous people’s identity”, says Albert Deterville, Chair-Rapporteur of the UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP). “This project can be with all certainty described as an example of successful cooperation of business companies, indigenous people and the United Nations system for promoting native languages of indigenous people. EMRIP recommends this positive practice of cooperation between the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights and Sakhalin Energy for wide use.”

The presentation ceremony was attended by representatives of Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, Siberia and Russian Far East as well as Russian scientific communities, government authorities and non-government organisations.

Sakhalin Energy provided financing for the translation and publication of the new book.

Notes to Editors

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948. It set out, for the first time ever, the fundamental human rights to be universally protected. UDHR consists of 30 articles and is part of the International Bill of Human Rights.

The Universal Declaration is the document most translated in the world. In addition to six official languages of the United Nations – English, Arabic, Spanish, Chinese, Russian and French, which are used by billions of people of the Earth – it has been translated into numerous other languages, from Abkhaz to Zulu.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 13 September 2007.

The Declaration establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity, well-being and rights of the world's indigenous peoples. The Declaration addresses both individual and collective rights; cultural rights and identity; rights to education, health, employment, language, and others. It outlaws discrimination against indigenous peoples and promotes their full and effective participation in all matters that concern them. It also ensures their right to remain distinct and to pursue their own priorities in economic, social and cultural development. The Declaration explicitly encourages harmonious and cooperative relations between states and indigenous peoples.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples has been translated into six official languages of the United Nations – English, Arabic, Spanish, Chinese, Russian and French – and to 52 other languages.

Sakhalin Energy Investment Company Ltd. (“Sakhalin Energy”) is the operator of Sakhalin-2, one of the world largest integrated projects, which has built an extensive infrastructure for hydrocarbon production, transportation and processing. The company is exporting crude oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) produced in the Okhotsk Sea and at Russia’s first LNG plant built by Sakhalin Energy in the south of Sakhalin. The company’s shareholders are Gazprom (50% + 1 share), Royal Dutch Shell (27.5% - 1 share), Mitsui and Co. Ltd. (12.5%) and Mitsubishi Corporation (10%).
Sakhalin Energy is a leader in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Social and environmental programmes of the company have been many times recognised by leading international and Russian experts.

In 2009, Sakhalin Energy joined the United Nations Global Compact, a United Nations initiative to encourage businesses worldwide to adopt sustainable and socially responsible policies. Sakhalin Energy is a member of the UN Global Compact Working Group for Human Rights.

In 2011 Sakhalin Energy became the first and thus far the only Russian company chosen by the UN to participate in its new Sustainable Corporate Leadership platform — the Global Compact LEAD, launched in the framework of the UN Global Compact. LEAD companies must perform certain ‘cutting-edge’ activities in the environmental, social protection and management spheres and create new CSR standards.

Since 2006, Sakhalin Energy, Regional Council of Authorised Representatives of the Sakhalin Indigenous Minorities and Sakhalin Oblast Government have been implementing a tripartite programme, Sakhalin Indigenous Minorities Development Plan (www.simdp.ru/eng.php). 

More information is available at the Sakhalin Energy website: www.sakhalinenergy.com

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is the United Nations’ agency that works to promote and protect the human rights worldwide. OHCHR is focused on ensuring compliance with the internationally recognized principles governing human rights. To this end, OHCHR assists in ratification and implementation of international human rights treaties worldwide and promotes respect for the law. Among the OHCHR aims is removing obstacles to complete observance of human rights and prevention of human rights violations.

As the principal United Nations office mandated to promote and protect human rights for all, OHCHR leads global human rights efforts and embodies the global community's aspiration to attain universal ideals in the field of human rights. OHCHR exposes human rights violations regardless of where those occur and speaks out objectively in the face of such violations. The Office provides a forum for identifying and developing responses to today's human rights challenges. OHCHR acts as the principal focal point of human rights research, education, public information and advocacy activities, while strengthening and mainstreaming human rights across the United Nations system.
OHCHR also supports the work of the United Nations human rights mechanisms, such as the Human Rights Council and the core treaty bodies set up for monitoring State Parties' compliance with international human rights treaties, and also promotes the right to development, coordinates United Nations human rights education and public information activities, and strengthens human rights across the United Nations system. OHCHR works to ensure the enforcement of universally recognized human rights norms, including through promoting both the universal ratification and implementation of the major human rights treaties and respect for the rule of law.

The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP) was established by the Human Rights Council, the United Nations’ main human rights body, in 2007 under Resolution 6/36 as a subsidiary body of the Council.

The Expert Mechanism provides the Human Rights Council with thematic advice, in the form of studies and research, on the rights of indigenous peoples as directed by the Council. The Expert Mechanism may also suggest proposals to the Council for its consideration and approval.

The Expert Mechanism is made up of five independent experts on the rights of indigenous peoples. The experts are appointed by the Human Rights Council, which is to give due regard to experts of indigenous origin, as well as to gender balance and geographic representation.

More information can be found at the EMRIP website: www.ohchr.org

Translators:
The official texts (Russian versions) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples were translated into the Nivkh language by V. M. Sangi, the creator of the Nivkh alphabet and orthography, the author of the Nivkh ABC book, textbooks and books, the founder of the Nivkh literature, as well as member of the Union of Russian Writers and recipient of the State Prize of the Russian Federation.
The official texts (Russian versions) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples were translated into the Uilta language by E.A. Bibikova and I.Ya. Fedyaeva, co-authors of the first (ABC) book of the Uilta language.
The official texts (Russian versions) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was translated into the Nanai language by R. A. Samar and S. D. Samar and edited by A. S. Kile, Associate Professor at Applied and Decorative Arts Department of Far-Eastern State Humanities University, holder of candidate’s degree in education.
The official texts (Russian versions) of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was translated into the Nanai language by L.Zh. Zaksor, Associate Professor at Altaic Languages, Folklore and Literature Department of the Institute of the People of the North at the Herzen State Teachers Training University of Russia, holder of candidate’s degree in philology.
The official texts (Russian versions) of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was translated into the Evenk language by N.Ya. Bulatova, Associate Professor/Lead Research Scientist at the Institute of Linguistic Research of the Russian Academy of Science, holder of candidate’s degree in philology.
The official texts (Russian versions) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was translated into the Evenk language by E.A. Afanasyeva.

Narrators:
V. M. Sangi – Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Nivkh language.
E. A. Bibikova – Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Uilta language.
L.Zh. Zaksor – Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Nanai language.
N.Ya. Bulatova – United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Evenk language.
K. F. Machekhina – Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the Evenk language.


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